Frequently asked questions

Got a question for us? If the answer isn’t here, give us a ring on 0423 049 433

Our most commonly asked questions are on this page. For any other questions, we’d love to hear from you. Give us a call and try us out. All our instructors are trained, hold QLD Blue Cards, are current in their CPR and First Aid qualifications, and love what they do!

Is Centenary Martial Arts an Asia Pacific Self Defence School?

Yes. Centenary Martial Arts (CMA) is an Asia Pacific Self Defence (APSD) school. As with APSD, it is Australian owned and operated. The Director and Chief Instructor is a 36 year veteran of the Australian Army and is passionate about Martial Arts and Self-defence. Give us a try. You will find us to be a family school with a local focus.

Are there other schools that belong to Asia Pacific Self Defence?

Yes, Ipswich Martial Arts is also a Asia Pacific Self Defence school.

What is the difference between Muay Thai and Hapkido?

Muay Thai, or literally Thai boxing is a combat sport of Thailand that uses stand-up striking along with various clinching techniques. It is known as the ‘art of eight limbs’, as it is characterised by the combined use of fists, elbows, knees and shins.
Hapkido had its parenthood in Japanese martial arts and indigenous Korean styles of Taekkyeon Tang Soo Do. It was developed in the 1960s and employs both long range and close-range fighting techniques. It utilises punching, kicking, knee strikes, jumping kicks, elbow strikes, percussive hand strikes at longer ranges, pressure point strikes, percussive hand strikes at longer ranges, pressure point strikes, joint locks and throws at closer fighting and grappling. It is considered a combat Martial Art and by definition, is a Mixed Martial Art.

What is the difference between Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) and Hapkido?

Mixed Martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows striking and grappling, both standing and, on the ground, using techniques from various combat sports and martial arts. The first documented use of the term ‘Mixed Martial Arts’ was in a review of the UFC 1 by Television critic Howard Rosenburg in 1993.
Hapkido had its parenthood in Japanese martial arts and indigenous Korean styles of Taekkyeon Tang Soo Do.  It was developed in the 1960s and employs both long range and close-range fighting techniques.  It utilises punching, kicking, knee strikes, jumping kicks, elbow strikes, percussive hand strikes at longer ranges, pressure point strikes, joint locks and throws at closer fighting distances and ground fighting and grappling.  It is considered a combat Martial Art and by definition is a Mixed Martial Art.

What is the difference between Taekwondo and Hapkido?

Both Taekwondo (TKD, Tae Kwon Do) and Hapkido are Korean Martial Arts.
Taekwondo (TKD, Tae Kwon Do) had its parenthood in Karate and Chinese Martial Arts, along with the indigenous Korean styles of Taekkyeon, Subak and Gwonbeop. It was developed in the 1940s and 1950s.
Hapkido had its parenthood in Japanese Martial Arts and indigenous Korean styles of Taekkyeon Tang Soo Do.  It was developed in the 1960s.
Taekondo (TKD, Tae Kwon Do) is characterised by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques.  It is generally considered a combative sport.
Hapkido employs both long range and close-range fighting techniques, utilising jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges, pressure point strikes, joint locks and throws at closer fighting distances and ground fighting and grappling.  It is considered a combat Martial Art.
Because Hapkido is a combat Martial Art (not a combat sport system) and covers all areas of attack and defence (standing, sitting, lying etc), it is an excellent and far more versatile Self defence system to learn.

What is the difference between BJJ and Hapkido?

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) was developed from Kodokan Judo ground fighting fundamentals that were taught by a number of Japanese individuals including Taeko Yano, Mitsuyo Maeda, Soshihiro Satake and also Isao Okano. One version of how it developed to be as it is today, is that in 1917, Carlos Gracie watched a demonstration by Mitsuyo Maeda and decided to learn Judo. Maeda accepted Gracie as a student and Gracie learnt for a few years, eventually passing his knowledge on to his brothers. Carlos Gracie’s brother, Helio Gracie, further developed Gracie Jiu-Jitsu as a softer, pragmatic adaption from judo that focused on ground fighting.
Hapkido had its parenthood in Japanese Martial Arts and indigenous Korean styles of Taekkyeon Tang Soo Do. It was developed in the 1960s.
Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) is a Martial Art and Combat sport system that focuses on grappling with emphasis on ground fighting.
Hapkido employs both long range and close-range fighting techniques, utilising jumping kicks and percussive hand strikes at longer ranges, pressure point strikes, joint locks and throws at closer fighting distances and ground fighting and grappling. It is considered a combat Martial Art.
Because Hapkido is a combat Martial Art (not a combat sport system) and covers all areas of attack and defence (standing, sitting, lying etc), it is an excellent and far more versatile Self defence system to learn.

Is there an annual membership fee?

No. The weekly fees cover everything, including gradings, grading belts, sports insurance and so on.

Is there a joining fee?

There is NO joining fee if you decide to pay an ongoing weekly fee as described in Option 1 of our regular classes (in price). If you decide to join under option 2 of our regular classes, the joining fee is a one off.

What is included in the joining fee?

If you decide to join us and pay by lesson as described in option 2 of our regular classes (in price), the joining fee will include an initial uniform, free gradings and future belts/certificates, no joining or ongoing annual fees. You will also be covered by our sports insurance.

Can I learn Hapkido without striving to attain a Black Belt?

Not everyone who learns a martial art wants to obtain a Black belt. Hapkido is no different. If you simply want to learn a martial art and self-defence and think Hapkido is right for you, but you’re not interested in grading through the belt levels, that’s fine by us. Simply join our lessons and we will teach you all there is to know, without the added pressure of grading.

What fitness level or experience do I need, to be able to learn Hapkido?

There is no minimum fitness level required to do Hapkido. Obviously, if a doctor is saying you shouldn’t be training, then you should not train. We have people of all fitness levels, weights, ailments, and ages training with us. In fact, we have people in their late 50s. If you have an injury that stops you doing something, then we will find an alternative technique to learn. If you’re considering Hapkido as a martial art or self-defence, don’t let your fitness or fear hold you back. Talk to us and we will find a way for you to train. The sooner you start, the sooner you will get the benefits.

Does Centenary Martial Arts arrange the exams needed to graduate to the next Belt level?

Yes. We have a monthly grading day (usually the first Saturday of each month) and if you are ready to grade, we will encourage you to do so. Remember, gradings, grading belts and certificates are free.

What are the Hapkido Belt colours?

At Centenary Martial Arts, we align our belt colours with the majority of Hapkido schools. Our adult and Teenage syllabus is the same as the adults, however, we generally wait until the teenager turns 17 and transitions to the Adult classes (with their worn belt), before progressing to Black Belt. We do that to ensure a level of maturity with the more advanced combat techniques. The adult and Teenage syllabus, belt colours are:
White
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Brown
Red
Provisional Black (Red/black)
Black.
The Bilbies, Wallabies and Falcons wear the same colour belts, however, they will never obtain a Black belt! Additionally, as Wallabies progress to the Falcons and the Falcons progress to the Teenage program, they will revert back to white.
The Bilbies belts are white with a coloured centre stripe. The Wallabies belts ate white with a coloured centre stripe and a Black stripe at the end. The Falcons belts are the graded colour (ie: yellow) with a white centre stripe